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Roman Baths

Roman Baths

Pump Room

Stall Street Bath

Bath and North East Somerset

Post Code : BA1 1LZ

Telephone : 01225 477 785

Admission Cost Admission Charge

Visit Their Website

The Roman Baths, dating from around 50 AD, are one of the best-preserved Roman sites. Lying below street level, the site features the Sacred Spring, the Roman Temple, the Roman Bath and finds from Roman Bath. The hot spring-fed a bathhouse which attracted people from across the Roman empire. The Great Bath is unfit for bathing. However, visitors can now experience the pleasure of bathing in the hot springs at the new Thermae Bath Spa. 

Other Tourist Attractions Near Roman Baths

Opening Times

Daily: Jan-Feb and Nov-Dec: 09:30-17:.30 ; Mar-Jun and Sept-Oct: 09:00-18:00; Jul-Aug: 09:00-22.00.  Closed 25/26 Dec.

Hotels near Roman Baths

  • The Gainsborough Bath Spa – Bath
  • SACO Bath – Bath
  • Abbey Hotel – Bath
  • Bed & Breakfast Berdoulat & Breakfast – Bath

Self-Catering near Roman Baths

  • Abbey Green Apartment – Bath
  • Abigail’s Parlour – Bath
  • University of Bath City Centre Campus – Bath
  • Harington’s Premier Townhouse – Bath

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North Parade Passage

North Parade Passage – Bath

Bath and North East Somerset

Free Admission

A charming pedestrianised street leading off Abbey Green is one of the few examples of Baths pre-Georgian architecture. The timber-framed houses were built along with a former priory orchard. Most of the buildings have been rebuilt over the centuries but Sally Lunns (4 North Parade Passage) had its timber-framework just hidden by a stone facade in 1720.  The Tudor building, dating from 1482, is said to be Baths oldest private house.

Other Tourist Attractions Near North Parade Passage

  • Abbey Green – Bath (0.02 miles)
  • Roman Baths – Bath (0.07 miles)
  • Pump Room – Bath (0.07 miles)
  • Pump Room Restaurant – Bath (0.07 miles)
  • Parade Gardens – Bath (0.12 miles)
  • Thermae Bath Spa – Bath (0.13 miles)
  • Grapes – Bath (0.13 miles)
  • Abbey Church House – Bath (0.14 miles)
  • Little Theatre Cinema – Bath (0.14 miles)
  • Victoria Art Gallery – Bath (0.14 miles)

Hotels near North Parade Passage

  • Abbey Hotel – Bath
  • Bed & Breakfast Berdoulat & Breakfast – Bath
  • Bath Backpackers Hostel – Bath
  •  Bed & Breakfast – Parade Park – Bath

Self-Catering near North Parade Passage

  • Abigail’s Parlour – Bath
  • Abbey Green Apartment – Bath
  • 3 Argyle Apartment – Bath
  • Harington’s Premier Townhouse – Bath

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Grapes – Bath

Grapes – 14 Westgate Street Bath

Bath and North East Somerset

Post Code: BA1 1EQ

Free Admission

Although this pub looks like it dates from Georgian times it is much older. In the 1600s numbers, 14 and 15 Westgate were one house. The building was given a major facelift in 1720 but many features from the early 1600s have survived on the upper floors. In 1728 the building was let to a vintner.  By 1776 it was known as the Bunch of Grapes and at the end of the 18th century, it had become a pub.

Other Tourist Attractions Near Grapes

  • Little Theatre Cinema – Bath (0.03 miles)
  • Bath Abbey – Bath (0.03 miles)
  • Thermae Bath Spa – Bath (0.06 miles)
  • Pump Room – Bath (0.06 miles)
  • Pump Room Restaurant – Bath (0.06 miles)
  • Abbey Church House – Bath (0.06 miles)
  • Main House Theatre Royal – Bath (0.08 miles)
  • Ustinov Studio Theatre Royal – Bath (0.08 miles)
  • The Egg – Theatre Royal – Bath (0.08 miles)
  • Roman Baths – Bath (0.08 miles)

Hotels near Grapes

  • The Gainsborough Bath Spa – Bath
  • Harington’s City Hotel – Bath
  • SACO Bath – Bath
  • Premier Inn Bath City Centre – Bath

Self-Catering near Grapes

  • Harington’s Premier Townhouse – Bath
  • Abbey Green Apartment – Bath
  • Abigail’s Parlour – Bath
  • University of Bath City Centre Campus – Bath
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Abbey Church House

Abbey Church House – Westgate BuildingsBathBath and North East SomersetFree Admission

Abbey Church House is Bath’s only surviving Elizabethan mansion. The Master of St John’s Hospital had a house on this site but in around 1590 the house was rebuilt by Dr Robert Baker. The great chamber and Elizabethan chimney-piece still survives. In the 16th century, it was a lodging house for Royality and members of the Elizabethan court. The west front is a post-war restoration after WWII bomb damage.

Other Tourist Attractions Near Abbey Church House

  • Thermae Bath Spa – Bath (0.01 miles)
  • Little Theatre Cinema – Bath (0.04 miles)
  • Grapes – Bath (0.06 miles)
  • Roman Baths – Bath (0.07 miles)
  • Bath Abbey – Bath (0.08 miles)
  • Pump Room – Bath (0.08 miles)
  • Pump Room Restaurant – Bath (0.08 miles)
  • Main House Theatre Royal – Bath (0.12 miles)
  • Ustinov Studio Theatre Royal – Bath (0.12 miles)
  • The Egg – Theatre Royal – Bath (0.12 miles)

Hotels near Abbey Church House

  • The Gainsborough Bath Spa – Bath
  • SACO Bath – Bath
  • Premier Inn Bath City Centre – Bath
  • Abbey Hotel – Bath

Self-Catering near Abbey Church House

  • University of Bath City Centre Campus – Bath
  • Abbey Green Apartment – Bath
  • Abigail’s Parlour – Bath
  • Harington’s Premier Townhouse – Bath

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Number 1 Royal Crescent

Bath, set in the rolling green hills of the Avon valley, was transformed into England’s first spa town by the Romans. In the 18th century, it regained its popularity.

At this time two architects, John Wood the Elder and John Wood the Younger, were responsible for creating Bath’s fine Georgian buildings. The Royal Crescent is a magnificent example of Palladian architecture and was designed by John Wood the Younger.

Work began on the Crescent in 1767 and it was completed in 1774.

No. 1 was the first of this graceful arc of 30 houses to be built.

The Royal Crescent is considered to be the most majestic street in Britain and the masterpiece of John Wood the Younger.

In 1968 No. 1 Royal Crescent was given to the Bath Preservation Trust.

Both the exterior and the interior of the house have been accurately restored and the house is now a museum.

It has been furnished as a grand town-house of the late 18th century and contains authentic furniture, carpets and paintings. The interior has been designed to give visitors a glimpse of what life was like for the 18th century aristocrats, such as the Duke of York, who lived here.

The basement houses the kitchen, which contains a dog-powered spit. The ground floor has a study and dining-room and on the first floor is the drawing room and a lady’s bedroom.

The second-floor landing has a series of maps of Bath. West of the Royal Crescent is the Royal Victoria Park established in 1830 and Bath’s largest open space.

Number 1Royal Crescent Bath Bath and North East Somerset

Post Code : BA1 2LR Telephone : 01225 428126 Admission Cost Admission Charge

Other Tourist Attractions Near Number 1 Royal Crescent

  • Georgian Garden – Bath (0.16 miles)
  • Museum of East Asian Art – Bath (0.18 miles)
  • Bath Assembly Rooms – Bath (0.20 miles)
  • Bath Museum of Costume – Bath (0.21 miles)
  • Jane Austen Centre – Bath (0.25 miles)
  • Royal Victoria Park – Bath (0.26 miles)
  • Botanical Gardens – Bath (0.26 miles)
  • Queen Square and Obelisk – Bath (0.30 miles)
  • Building of Bath Museum – Bath (0.30 miles)
  • William Herschel Museum – Bath (0.32 miles)
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Bath Assembly Rooms

The Assembly Rooms, originally known as the Upper Rooms, were designed by John Wood the younger and opened in 1771. They were the third set of such rooms to be built in Bath.

The Assembly Rooms were a place where the company could dance, play cards and drink tea.

When work began on the rooms in 1769, Queen Square and the Circus designed by John Wood the elder had been completed and work had begun on the terraces and streets that would culminate with John Wood the younger’s magnificent Royal Cresent.The impressive Bath stone Assembly Rooms are set across a wide pavement.

They dominate their surroundings with two classical facades either side of the central pedimented entrance.

The rather austere exterior gives no idea of the sumptuous decoration within.

The ballroom is a 100 feet long and the largest 18th century room in Bath. It could hold 800 – 1,200 people on ball nights.

This classical room, rising to a coved ceiling at the height of the building, is lit by windows on the second-floor level only. The Corinthian columns flanking the windows are picked out in white against the blue walls. Five great candle-lit chandeliers illuminated the room.

The tearoom with a double screen of columns at one end is also spectactular.

The original suite of rooms was completed by the octagon or card playing room, where an organ provided entertainment on Sundays when card playing was prohibited.

However, in 1777 another card room was built to cope with the vast number of people who congregated there.

The bath was transformed from a provincial watering-place to an international resort in the 18th century under the influence of Beau Nash. Read More

Bath Assembly Rooms Opening Times
2009: Daily Feb:10:30-17:00 ; Mar-Oct:10:30-18:00 ; Nov-Jan: 10:30-17:00. Last entry 60mins before close. Closed when functions and 25/26 Dec. Some rooms may be closed when there are functions. Access guaranteed Aug – tel to check other months.
Tel: 01225 477173

Visit the Bath Assembly Rooms Website

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Featured Bath and North East Somerset Historic Houses To Visit

Bath Assembly Rooms

In Alfred Sreet, Bath, east of the Circus. The Assembly Rooms were designed by John Wood the younger and opened in 1771. A place to dance, play cards and drink tea. The exterior gives no idea of the decoration inside. Ballroom, tearoom, card room. The high society of Georgian England gathered here for balls and occasions as well as concerts. More Details On Bath Assembly Rooms

Number 1 Royal Crescent

In Bath, 0.25 mile northwest of the city centre – A magnificent example of Palladian architecture designed by John Wood the Younger and completed in 1774. No. 1 was the first 30 houses to be built here. Both the exterior and the interior of the house have been accurately restored and the house is now a museum. More Details On Number 1 Royal Crescent

Other Houses and Interesting Buildings in Bath and North East Somerset

Abbey Church House – Bath

Grapes – Bath

North Parade Passage – Bath

Pump Room – Bath

Roman Baths – Bath

Saracens Head – Bath

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Gardens in England to Visit

England has a wide range of gardens open to the public, from small cottage gardens and kitchen gardens through to landscaped parks and gardens.

These can often include collections of rare plants.

Today English Gardens are very popular attractions to visit, and in the summer you may have to wait to get in.

Note that many places are closed in the winter months, and the smaller gardens may only open on a few days, but whenever you go if you are making a special journey please telephone the establishment to confirm opening hours as these do change , especially if there is an event on.

We are always updating gardens !

Also visit our Gardens In London section

Choose a county for details of our featured gardens – for other gardens see our county tourist guide pages. or choose from the list below.

Bath and North East Somerset

Bedfordshire

Cheshire

Cornwall

Derbyshire

Devon

Dorset

East Sussex

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hampshire

Herefordshire

Kent

Norfolk

North Yorkshire

Northamptonshire

Shropshire

Somerset

Suffolk

Surrey

West Sussex

Wiltshire

Featured Gardens By English County

Bath and North East Somerset

Bedfordshire

Cheshire

Cornwall

Derbyshire

Devon

Dorset

East Sussex

Essex

Gloucestershire

Hampshire

Herefordshire

Kent

Norfolk

North Yorkshire

Northamptonshire

Shropshire

Somerset

Suffolk

Surrey

West Sussex

Wiltshire

Popular English Gardens

Sissinghurst Castle Gardens Kent

Tapeley Park Devon

Trelissick Cornwall

Leonardslee Gardens West Sussex

The Menagerie Northamptonshire

Nymans Garden West Sussex

Owl House Gardens Kent

Castle Ashby Gardens Northamptonshire

Rosemoor Devon

Raveningham Hall Norfolk